picket

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picket

a person involved in a STRIKE who seeks to prevent other persons from gaining access to a place of work during an INDUSTRIAL DISPUTE. In the UK, picketing one's own place of work is lawful; picketing other people's places of work (secondary picketing) is unlawful. See SECONDARY ACTION.

picket

a person, either on strike or supporting that strike, who seeks to prevent other persons from gaining access to a place of work during the course of an INDUSTRIAL DISPUTE. In the UK, picketing one's own place of work is lawful; picketing other people's places of work (secondary picketing) is unlawful.
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References in classic literature ?
It was not alluded to in any way, and no pale young gentleman was to be discovered on the premises.
At the end of the yard a dark mass, tinted with a dingy blue by the morning dawn, rose before him, its dark outlines standing out in contrast to the houses already illuminated by the pale light of early morning.
Yes, yes," said De Guiche, "a strange face; but these monks are subject to such degrading practices; their fasts make them pale, the blows of the discipline make them hypocrites, and their eyes become inflamed through weeping for the good things of this life we common folk enjoy, but they have lost.
The persons of their world lived in an atmosphere of faint implications and pale delicacies, and the fact that he and she understood each other without a word seemed to the young man to bring them nearer than any explanation would have done.
Pale, frightened people were doing something around the workman.
It was all very well to look pale, sitting for the portrait of Aquinas, you know--we got your letter just in time.
The pale faces have driven the red-skins from their hunting grounds, and now when they fight, a white man leads the way.
Ah, here you are, monsieur," she said in her naturally calm voice; "but how pale you are
Although the young man was brave, as we know, he was terrified at that wild countenance, those terribly dilated pupils, those pale cheeks, and those bleeding lips.
He had a long, thin body and the scholar's stoop; his head was large and ugly; he had pale scanty hair and an earthy skin; his thin mouth and thin, long nose, and the great protuberance of his frontal bones, gave him an uncouth look.
The clerk was pale, and there was an odd sensation in his throat.
Then came a little valley overgrown with the pale purple bloom of thistles and elusively haunted with their perfume.