Dovish

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Dovish

Refers to the tone of language used to describe a situation and the associated implications for actions. For example, if the Federal Reserve bank refers to inflation in a dovish tone, it is unlikely that they would take agressive actions. Similarly, a CEO might use dovish language to describe an important event facing the firm. This indicates that the firm is unlikely to take strong actions. Dovish sometimes means conciliatory. Opposite of hawkish.

Dovish

Describing a statement from the Federal Reserve indicating that it may lower interest rates. The statement is called dovish because it indicates that the Fed does not believe that the inflation rate is high enough to warrant concern. See also: Hawkish.
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For Japan's elderly, some of whom remember World War II firsthand, there is little time left to pass on to younger generations Japan's postwar legacy of pacifism.
Greg Hopkins' new book, A Time To Kill: The Myth of Christian Pacifism, argues that the Bible does not teach pacifist principles as a moral response to criminal assault but in fact, teaches just the opposite in both Old and New Testaments, praising soldiers and law enforcement on numerous occasions and giving civilians explicit permission to use deadly force in life-threatening situations.
Of course, to crown pacifism as a major feature of Judaism is to go beyond what one can find in the Bible and the Jewish scriptures.
If I believe in a peaceful world, if I believe that pacifism is a way to be, then I have to act on that because faith without works is dead.
Thirty years before Penyberth, pacifism was not uncommon in the Labour movement.
This is contrasted with the struggles of pacifism and related movements in the face of fascism and World War II, when "the term pacifism increasingly acquired a pejorative, even treasonous, connotation.
This book addresses some fundamental questions about peace and pacifism after the events of 11 September 2001.
Rather than a passive or absolutist type of pacifism, Cortright emphasizes a more pragmatic or conditional pacifism that opposes and seeks to prevent war but allows for the possibility of the use of force, including lethal force, in cases where nonviolent methods have failed and "the victims of tyranny and abuse cry out for help.
I realize that life often forces us to choose between varieties of failure, so I cannot accept absolute pacifism.
The issue may be pro or con the ordination of women, the power of bishops, the "correct" rite of the eucharist, Christology, the number of sacraments, the restoration of planet Earth, the private ownership of property, militarism or pacifism.
The Moral Disarmament of France: Education, Pacifism, and Patriotism, 1914--1940 by Mona L.
Prophetic Realism: Beyond Militarism and Pacifism in an Age of Terror.