orthographic

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orthographic

A three-dimensional image represented in two dimensions with no perspective, as if the original were truly flat.Architectural drawings of elevations—the different sides of a building—have no perspective detail but are orthographic. Many local tax assessor's offices and online property information services include orthographic aerial or satellite photographs of properties, corrected for the earth's curvature.

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In summary, it would seem that despite the orthographical revision discussed above, differences clearly attributable to diachronic factors can still be discerned in the realm of spelling.
Rolandus Demeulenaere [Turnholti: Brepols, 1985] 177-78: I have made a few slight orthographical changes.
But they rightly argue that an author's orthographical habits are inevitably obscured within the printing house.
6) For the Goddess of Mercy, there are mainly three orthographical ways to spell her name in the Latin alphabet: "Guanyin", "Kuan-Yin" or Kwan-yin.
Both average to above average compositions were fairly organized, addressed the issue adequately, and had fewer grammatical, orthographical, and mechanical errors than others at their same level.
Among other things, it establishes orthographical and definitional standards, which though by no means impervious to change, may be quite persistent.
Given this work's pervasive italics, segmentations, editorial intrusions and personalized shorthand, "A Man" can appear less like a story than an orthographical event.
In this respect, as shown in Figure 1, I suggest three basic elements to integrate into this dimension, which reach, in my view, all of the most important aspects of a well-presented and well-written research paper: logical organization of the ideas, construction of the sentence structures, and orthographical quality.
The poem exhibits the orthographical features of the time and those endorsed by the Society for the Preservation of the Irish Language, namely the use of a hyphen to separate an eclipsis for the initial letter.
instability [of names] can result either from changes in ideas about relationships [= meanings or contents] or from changes in ideas about categorical assignments [resulting in orthographical changes].
There is some orthographical variation between the two manuscripts.
Thornton appears to have taken Franklin's orthographical system as his point of departure, but Thornton's alphabet had thirty letters, seven of them his own inventions.