I

(redirected from oropharyngeal cancer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

I

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that it is the third preferred bond of the company.

I

1. On a stock transaction table, a symbol indicating that a dividend was paid after a stock split.

2. A symbol appearing next to a bond listed on NASDAQ indicating that the bond is a company's third preferred bond. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if the letter "I" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is a third preferred bond.

i

Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables to indicate that the dividend was paid after a stock dividend or split: Lehigh s.20i.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Our finding of >70% HPV prevalence in a large sample of the oropharyngeal cancer patients from around the United States suggests that a substantially higher faction may be HPV-related than has been reported in many previous investigations (14).
However, 82% believed the consequence of HPV infection in their sons would be severe; of these, 31% ranked penile cancer as the most severe possible outcome, 30% oropharyngeal cancer, 23% anal cancer, and 16% genital warts.
Gillison and her colleagues compared the time it took for cancer to progress or the patient to die (progression-free survival) and overall survival between 206 patients with oropharyngeal cancer containing HPV (mostly HPV subtype 16) and 117 patients with HPV-negative cancers; all patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy.
A review of the Oropharyngeal Cancer products under development by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources.
It has recently been established as a cause of the majority of oropharyngeal cancers, a malignancy of the tonsils and base of tongue.
The study has established that more than half of recently diagnosed oropharyngeal cancers are caused by HPV.
3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, found the proportion of oropharyngeal cancers, particularly among men, that tested positive for HPV increased significantly over time.
Gillison and her colleagues used four different assays to determine the HPV status for 271 oropharyngeal cancer cases collected from 1984 to 2004 by three population-based cancer registries of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program in Hawaii, Iowa, and Los Angeles.
Retrospective studies have demonstrated improved outcomes with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancers relative to those associated with tobacco and alcohol exposure.
Secondly, the percentage of HPV-related diseases is high in some groups of men--for example, oropharyngeal cancer, conjunctival squamous cancer, genital warts, and anal and penile cancers in homosexual, bisexual, and HIV-positive men.
Researchers conducted a hospital-based clinical study in patients with newly diagnosed oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) to look at the association between HPV and OPC.
Franco asserts that the health costs, morbidity, and mortality associated with cervical cancer are sufficiently important to justify action and that the HPV vaccination is likely to exert protection against other neoplastic diseases such as oropharyngeal cancer and benign genital warts.