delivery

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Delivery

The tender and receipt of an actual commodity or financial instrument in settlement of a futures contract.

Delivery

The transfer of a security or an underlying asset to a buyer. The term is often used in options, forward, and futures contracts, in which payment and delivery are separated by a relatively long period of time. Most of the time, however, delivery does not occur, as most traders offset their positions with opposite contracts.

delivery

1. The transfer of a security to an investor's broker in order to satisfy an executed sell order. Delivery is required by the settlement date.
2. The transfer of a specified commodity in order to meet the requirements of a commodity contract that has been sold.

delivery

The transfer of possession from one person to another.Deeds and leases require delivery before they are effective. Delivery does not depend on manual transfer, but does depend on the intent of the parties. Deeds are delivered when placed within the possession or control of the grantee in such a manner that the grantor cannot regain possession or control.

References in periodicals archive ?
The morbidity associated with vaginal delivery, especially instrumental vaginal delivery, has received considerable attention over the last decade and the incidence of operative delivery continues to decrease in the United States.
Neonatal outcomes were generally favorable, but these young women had a high rate of operative delivery (62%, compared with our institutional rate of 33%) due to the failure to achieve undetectable viral load (Am.
CHICAGO--Monitoring and labor induction produce comparable neonatal outcome and operative delivery rates in women with suspected intrauterine growth restriction at term, based on the multicenter randomized DIGITAT study.
The primary outcome was the rate of operative delivery.
Similarly, the operative delivery rate (which included cesarean plus instrumental assisted vaginal delivery) was 49%, 45%, and 45% in the low-, moderate-, and high-pain groups, respectively; these values were not significantly different.
iatrogenic prematurity, shoulder dystocia, and operative delivery, as well as all the verbal and written communications that are involved with each of these areas.
Women who had an episiotomy or who required operative delivery were excluded.