Open

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Open

Used in the context of general equities. Having either buy or sell interest at the indicated price level and side of a preceding trade. "Open on the buy/sell side" means looking for buyers/sellers (for someone who is a seller/buyer). Antithesis of clean.

Open

1. The time trading begins on an exchange. This is important to matters like a security's opening price or opening bid. See also: Close.

2. An order to buy or sell a security that has not yet been filled. Some orders are only open for a certain amount of time, while some remain open until they are filled. See also: IOC, GTC.
References in periodicals archive ?
Station officer Steve Franklin, of Bickenhill Fire Station, is now calling on any residents with open fires in their homes to check them over to reduce the risk of a fire breaking out.
A policeman and a prisoner were killed on the spot as some unknown armed people open fire on the security vehicle as a result of which four including policemen were injured.
It spurred firefighters to step up warnings about the importance of using properly-fitting fireguards after it emerged the blaze was caused by a spark from an open fire which ignited the carpet.
Among the 1,717 mothers, 871 cooked with wood over an open fire during pregnancy, 489 used a wood stove with a chimney, and 357 employed electricity or gas.
Chandler, after speaking with superior officers by radio, had ordered machine-gunners from his heavy-weapons company to set up near the tunnel mouths and open fire.
Israeli forces keep several military posts along the eastern edge of the Strip from which soldiers open fire.
A ROARING open fire in the living room is generally seen as a major selling point, but could they soon be threatened by the Eurocrats because they are an inefficient use of energy?
Noam Friedman's intention to open fire on Palestinians but failed to report them.
Other tactics have been for ordinary Iraq is to surround arriving soldiers and appear to welcome them before dispersing to allow troops to open fire from a short distance.