one-sided market

One-Way Market

A market in which there are only potential buyers or potential sellers, but not both. That is, quotes for a one-way market only have a bid or an ask price. One-way markets are, by their nature, illiquid, and, on most exchanges, dealers and/or market makers exist to prevent them from forming. However, regulations sometimes require a one-way market to form, at least temporarily. For example, some countries forbid the resale of an IPO for a certain period of time.

one-sided market

The market for a security in which only a single side, either the bid or the ask, is quoted. Also called one-way market. Compare two-sided market. See also without.
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Don't be fooled by the one-sided market - this is a close one to call, and one goal could be enough to settle it.
Opportunistic Algorithm - GETAlpha's initial algorithmic offering, launched in June 2011, allows investors to trade by passively posting liquidity, in essence acting as a one-sided market maker.
By contrast, in a one-sided market, firms choose the product or service characteristics and customers' value depends only on that choice.
The early literature was mostly focused on price theory, explaining difference between pricing in multi-sided markets and one-sided markets by emphasizing the need to coordinate users and bring all sides on board.
GBPUSD -Our sentiment-based forex trading strategies went aggressively long the GBPUSD on its run to fresh peaks, as clearly one-sided market sentiment gave contrarian signal to go long.
Put another way, the spread widening reflects the risk of a one-sided market.
This stands in sharp contrast to one-sided market models, which need to set the prices above zero for consumers in order to recover costs (e.
Ebay, Google Search, Facebook, Youtube as well as almost all other advertisement-supported free services) or as its own service provider, thus operating a one-sided market model (e.
On the one hand, we had called for a sustained US Dollar reversal on extremely one-sided market positioning.
The economics literature on platforms and two-sided markets shows that applying insights from the analysis of one-sided markets to two-sided markets might be misleading.
This argument is about one-sided markets and tells us nothing about the paid prioritization arrangements that broadband providers want to impose.
In this case there is a "multiplier" effect, as a price increase reduces demand more than in standard one-sided markets.