Nominalism

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Nominalism

The legal principle that the dollar amount of a debt remains the same regardless of the inflation rate. Inflation and deflation, which both change the real value of repayment, do not affect the amount of a debt recorded on a balance sheet. In theory, this places risks on both the lender and the borrower, but, in practice, the lender has most of the risk, as inflation, which reduces the real value of repayment, is more likely than deflation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, then, ethical skepticism follows from four contentions: (1) "right" and "wrong" vary from society to society and time to time; (2) values reduce to personal taste because the individual perceiver distorts whatever he/she thinks or feels; (3) values are conditioned/caused/ determined by external and ultimately impersonal physical or psychological factors; and (4) values are grounded in empirical, contingent and nominalistic circumstances.
15:6 implicitly relies upon the concept of God's word's effecting reality in a covenantal context, which means that a nominalistic understanding of "reckoned" (elogis-the) in Rom.
Such a nominalistic conundrum is of course insoluble, or a false dichotomy, but can still be heuristically useful.
Here casuistry reveals its nominalistic roots, so apparent both in its famed 16th-century proponent, John Mair, as well as in its contemporary champion, Stephen Toulmin.
I am interested not in the indictment of Wiesel for transforming his nominalistic memoir into novelistic form, but in how, in response to publishing circumstances and perhaps his own transformation, he reconfigured an existential novel about the descent into moral night into a somewhat affirmative reemergence to life.
The nominalistic species concept rejects notions of "essential character" and conceives of species as groups of organisms with common attributes and that share a common descriptive name.
The second point has to do with the question of whether Anselm's language in discussing the Trinity is nominalistic.
This he dismissed as the outcome of a nominalistic approach to law that resulted in treating names as 'no more than useful vocables' or as an 'empty sound' corresponding to 'no factual reality' (161).
Nominalistic definitions of concepts such as "species" are often deemed essential to evolutionary biology.
The idea that there are "two sides to every question" is an embodiment of nominalistic philosophy, and is hard to understand for those unfamiliar with this philosophy or with its influence.
He characterized the whole of modern European philosophy from Descartes to his day as a tedious set of variations on the same nominalistic theme.
Before concentrating on Molinet, Randall introduces us to the writings of Jean Gerson, whose nominalistic epistemology goes hand in hand with a moderate mysticism, an emphasis on affective contemplation as a means by which the will can approach the divine.