Headline

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Headline

A brief statement at the beginning of an article, usually in larger type than the rest of the article, that describes what the article will state. Headlines are often abbreviated and may be deliberately sensational, especially in tabloids. A famous example of a headline occurred during the Great Crash in 1929, when Variety magazine reported, "WALL ST. LAYS AN EGG."
References in periodicals archive ?
COMMIES INVADE SOUTH KOREA'' read the newspaper headlines June 25, 1950.
ASHING in on newspaper headlines for fiction scripts seems to be the latest mantra on TV these days.
Apparently, he resides on nirvana island without any access to world news or newspaper headlines - the only place where the pen is still mightier than the sword.
CRUNCH thus relates economics to everyday life and concerns, considering ethics, business concerns and links between newspaper headlines and everyday life.
April's theme is Read All About It and children will have the opportunity to celebrate with children's TV and book characters, Charlie and Lola, by making newspaper headlines and collages.
Each scene was divided with the help of Brecht-style captions, which read like newspaper headlines.
Author Richard Hains skillfully draws upon his many years as a professional finance expert and successful global investor to provide realistic background detail in his novel "Chameleon", a gripping and highly recommended work of suspense that could have been plucked from the newspaper headlines of today.
Eye-opening and timely reading given today's political climate and newspaper headlines.
Despite newspaper headlines screaming of a slowdown in the housing market, New York City brokers say business here is good, as investors make a sharp exit from the scene leaving serious buyers to look for home, sweet homes.
From the perspective of newspaper headlines, judicial activity on the education front was uncharacteristically unspectacular last year.
They fully engage our ability to multitask, whether we're reading the imagery (and mentally translating it back into newspaper headlines or sports-magazine stories), following the dissolution of the subject into luscious pools of pattern and paint, or doing both at the same time.
Opening the festival is Headlines which involves five short plays all inspired by recent newspaper headlines.