Headline

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Headline

A brief statement at the beginning of an article, usually in larger type than the rest of the article, that describes what the article will state. Headlines are often abbreviated and may be deliberately sensational, especially in tabloids. A famous example of a headline occurred during the Great Crash in 1929, when Variety magazine reported, "WALL ST. LAYS AN EGG."
References in periodicals archive ?
Very often, the fractured grammar and idiosyncratic vocabulary of English newspaper headlines challenge the understanding even of native speakers.
Set in San Francisco during 1853, it follows the wide-eyed exploits of an enthusiastic young man whose pasttimes include shouting the latest newspaper headlines from a street corner, and tracking down a gold miner who has gone missing.
Newspaper headlines (see Table 1), which arguably may hold some truth, have tended to highlight negative unintended consequences of large-scale assessment (Cizek, 2001).
Goddard comes off as a self-centered, shallow person who cared only about honors and newspaper headlines.
Newspaper headlines touted the transaction as the largest sum of money ever paid for a residential property in Sarasota County.
When the president of Mexico does it, however, it generates a church-state controversy that dominates newspaper headlines.
If it weren't for bad news, we'd get no news at all--a sentiment echoed by many workers in the long-term care industry as they read newspaper headlines across the country.
On March 13, 2002, newspaper headlines declare that a late night resolution has been approved by the United Nations Security Council backing the creation of a Palestinian state for the first time.
Newspaper headlines around the world boldly declaring the latest IMF or OECD macroeconomic forecast.
We manage to complete aerospace projects ensemble, and our wars are now fought out on the sports field, in newspaper headlines and committee meetings, surely that's progress enough?
Newspaper headlines screamed, "Swine Sewage Sweeps Downstream" and "25 Million Gallons Lost at Hog Farm.
Dos Passos reinforces the histories of his fictional characters with interpolated montages of newspaper headlines and popular songs.