Blockade

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Blockade

The act of preventing food, medicine, materials and/or other supplies from entering or leaving a country. A blockade occurs when one country sends its military and sets up a perimeter, disallowing the blockaded supplies from being exported or imported. A blockade is an act of war and is obviously disruptive to international trade.
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Reversal of neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex in an obese myasthenic patient undergoing thymectomy.
1) An intense nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockade can be evaluated by the response to posttetanic single twitch stimulation; 2) Magnitude of posttetanic facilitation was negatively correlated with time to first response to TOF nerve stimulation; and 3) Time to return of response to TOF nerve stimulation may be derived from the number of posttetanic twitch responses present (PTC).
Residual neuromuscular blockade, which is an important cause of NMBA-associated morbidity in surgical patients, was not reported in any patient in this study.
Key Words: neuromuscular blockade, neuromuscular function monitor, residual neuromuscular blockade
In the clinical trials conducted to date, sugammadex has generally demonstrated the ability to reverse shallow and profound depths of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade within 3 minutes, thereby enabling control of the onset and offset of skeletal muscle relaxation through the use of both drugs.
In the patient receiving a neuromuscular blockade and sedation, the optimal BIS level for sedation appears to be between 40 and 60.
Corneal protection and thromboembolism prophylaxis should be implemented in most patients on prolonged neuromuscular blockade.
At the end of the surgery (subtotal thyroidectomy), under standard, controlled endotracheal general anaesthesia, the neuromuscular blockade was reversed and anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane 1.
Retention of secretions is thought to increase the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in patients receiving neuromuscular blockade for a prolonged period.
The Aurora trial compared the efficacy of sugammadex and neostigmine for the reversal of shallow neuromuscular blockade induced by single or multiple doses of either rocuronium (Esmeron(R)/Zemuron(R)) or vecuronium (Norcuron(R)).
When administered exogenously to animals treated with AV002, the reversal agent has been shown to rapidly and completely reverse neuromuscular blockade.
We recently anaesthetised a man with Brugada syndrome presenting for a panendoscopy as a day surgical patient using sugammadex reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade electively.