Necessary

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Necessary

An expense that is appropriate and helpful in furthering the taxpayer's business or income-producing activity. See also Ordinary defined elsewhere in this glossary.
References in periodicals archive ?
Validity does not necessarily predict clinical relevance, but it is certainly important to understand whether reported information is believable before deciding whether to rely upon it for changes in clinical management.
Expansion of the medical workforce does not necessarily result in an efficient or equitable distribution of doctors, geographically or in terms of specialty, say Dr.
Although the prohibited transaction exception provides a new planning opportunity for banks considering S status, eligible IRAs and their beneficiaries may not necessarily want to take advantage of it.
Reading less literature is not necessarily an indicator that people are not reading," says Carla Hayden, executive director of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore.
Therefore the task of the nationalist is to mobilize popular sentiment in support of the movement even when its ideology may not necessarily resonate with the values and desires of the populous.
Thus, the larger size of a cohort may not necessarily increase its power to detect genetic or environmental contributors to complex diseases.
The kids won't necessarily get it (particularly if Bourne's version is balanced against Balanchine).
For an administrative expense to be deductible under IRC section 2053, it must be (a) incurred in the administration of the decedent's estate, (b) actually and necessarily incurred and (c) allowable by the laws of the jurisdiction under which the estate is being administered.
Now, human beings automatically, necessarily, desire happiness.
The resident is not necessarily thinking about being sexual with her; rather, his genitals simply could be having a normal physiologic reaction to being touched.
Note that these recipes are not necessarily vegetarian, and not necessarily possible, either.
Catholic scholars have traditionally maintained that the Greek word adelphos used in the New Testament passages could mean "cousin" or another relative, not necessarily a blood brother.