Name

(redirected from naming)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Name

A wealthy individual who provides a great deal of capital that underwrites the activities of Lloyd's of London. Names spread risk of insurance among themselves along with corporations. For most of Lloyd's centuries-long history, names had unlimited liability for any losses associated with being a name. Lloyd's introduced names with limited liability in 1994, and they have become increasingly important.
References in periodicals archive ?
She searches her memory and then her unconscious for hours, trying to connect with Sapphira, to bring the Mother into being by naming her.
And, since many of our clients are doing business globally, the challenges around naming can be incredibly complex.
In other words, for Ellison there is always that which necessarily escapes any act of naming, any attempt at mastery; an impassable epistemological and linguistic gap separates what is named and its name.
In case Harry predeceases Betty, the couple can eliminate estate taxes by naming a bypass trust as the beneficiary of Harry's IRA.
First, Bremer points out that although Linnaeus presented systems for both classification and nomenclature, only the naming system has endured.
By the time I arrived, 1,500 names already had been rejected by the naming committee for being too long, too short, too narrow, too difficult, etc.
When we name children, all we do is sit in the kitchen and go over the names of relatives who we would want to honor by naming our children after them.
However, this effect proves weaker than the disturbance in color naming caused by mismatches of words and ink colors.
Some fruit fly geneticists complain that younger researchers lack the imagination of their predecessors, and that the wild and woolly days of gene naming may be drawing to a close.
One wonders how Brunfels would have reacted to the naming of such a sensual plant in his honor.
When queried on the future of corporate and product naming, 19 percent say that "coined," or fabricated names will remain popular; nine percent see a trend toward adopting names that had been part of a company's heritage, but 57 percent see a trend toward more "real" or authentic-sounding names--either singular or compound words (e.