Name

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Name

A wealthy individual who provides a great deal of capital that underwrites the activities of Lloyd's of London. Names spread risk of insurance among themselves along with corporations. For most of Lloyd's centuries-long history, names had unlimited liability for any losses associated with being a name. Lloyd's introduced names with limited liability in 1994, and they have become increasingly important.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nobody is saying having their name synonymous with a deadly hurricane even approaches the misery said event leaves in its wake.
When Joseph Ratzinger was elected pope, why did he choose the name Benedict?
Ever since Theodore White poked his notebook behind the scenes of presidential campaigns, the magic words "the making of" have promised readers a definitive explanation of how brainy, stalwart, hard-working people accomplish something of importance--in this case, perhaps, how the people at General Mills thought up the name Wheaties or hipsters at Apple conjured up the moniker iPod.
However, the word "Beloved" on the tombstone is not a name either; it is both an adjective describing Sethe's feelings about her child and the traditional salutation at a Christian funeral service (indeed, "Dearly Beloved" are the only two words of her daughter's funeral service that the bereaved Sethe hears).
changed its name to Citizens USA Life Insurance Co.
Whether nonlatinized binomials should become the official species names of viruses has been debated within the ICTV for many years (21,22,25-28).
Although it takes a little more work initially to create names, it should be clear they make formulas easier to write and to read.
In creating descriptive names for some species, Linnaeus "was a prurient guy," opines Yanega, who created one of the online collections of nomenclaturial high jinks.
cable channel had an afternoon music show of the same name.
A numbering system similar to our telephone takes over, destroying all the fun of promoting and advertising interesting web names, replaced by dull numerical sequences.
When Morgan Stanley offered to buy the domain name for "a reasonable fee," they got a quick email reply: "Give us an offer we cannot refuse.
It's optimized for high speed--high transfer rates and fast data access, that is, hence, the "ac" root in the name, which, I suppose, they picked to suggest "acceleration," only without the extra "c.