Liberalism

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Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Note that among the control variables, industry munificence was also positively related to profit growth (p < .
The model in this paper also controls for the effects of environmental munificence, organizational age, changes in organizational size, and organizational size on rates of reorganization.
Never mind that the people picking up the tab for this bailout will ultimately be middle class taxpayers--whose thanks for their forced munificence will come in the form of decimated retirement savings and a crippled Social Security system.
The munificence of Dubai's contribution to the British bloodstock market did not end with its ruler's purchases.
Furthermore, that prince generally "makes himself an example of humanity [umanita] and munificence, always keeping a firm hold on the majesty of his dignity [la maesta della dignita sua].
It is the one-way street named "kindness"--simple acts of munificence, of offering a helping hand.
Traditionally there has been a tendency to separate the economic and religious spheres and religious structures have been studied either in terms of style and chronology or as objects of royal munificence providing legitimization to the political elite.
Civic munificence in the Roman Empire involved a delicate balance between, on the one hand, the provision of spectacles and other ephemera and, on the other, contributions to the physical fabric of the ancient city.
Carnegie, too, is remembered for his unprecedented munificence, made possible through a professional life of driving his competitors out of business and trying to quash organized labor.
Beyond worthy advice about craft, however, these books display something even more valuable: a munificence of spirit that is profoundly encouraging.
Now, if Divine bestowal and munificence should cause the Divine treasures to be lessened, or in other words, if the descent of things from the treasures should be by tajf, then whenever God gives all of the good of this world and of the next to a single individual, two related problems arise: The act would eventually completely exhaust the treasuries of good, and subsequently make it impossible to give anything else of good to others.
Handing out free reeds to charities, where the drug maker can't trumpet its munificence throughout the distribution process, has less appeal.