Bilingualism

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Bilingualism

The ability to speak two languages. In areas where two languages are common, bilingual individuals are often paid more to do the same jobs as monolingual persons because they are able to service more customers with less difficulty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants in my research spoke of their multilingualism as fundamentally shaping their identities.
In the next two chapters, the authors examine conceptualizations of multilingualism in European institutions.
Professor Angela Creese said: "The research will make a significant contribution to knowledge about the potential of multilingualism.
Such themes can be identified, but the editorial choice to forgo such distinctions conveys the varied richness of approaches to multilingualism in medieval Britain.
Furthermore, the author focuses on multilingualism as the necessity of mutual national and international linguistic-cultural cooperation among citizens to ensure protection for all minority languages, then, reaching the development of a country immerse in a process of globalization.
I would like to mention that Communication on Multilingualism is a policy of the E.
The popular MA in Bilingualism and Multilingualism is also available as a distance learning option.
However, the phenomenon of multilingualism has only established itself as an area of systematic research in language and linguistic studies over the last two decades (Franceschini, 2009: 9), mainly because of an increased awareness of the sociological reality present in most parts of the world, where over 50% of the population is bi- or multilingual and massive immigration has an immediate impact on the number of languages spoken.
Leonard Orban, former EU Commissioner for Multilingualism in the European Commission, is going to be appointed Romanian Minister for the Management of EU Funds.
The language policy will be targeted at development of multilingualism and the official language.
After eliminating participants who displayed symptoms of dementia, the researchers looked at whether the healthy participants--who averaged about 73 years of age--were able to speak two or more languages, and whether multilingualism was associated with better mental performance.
2008: The Blackwell Guide to Research Methods in Bilingualism and Multilingualism.
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