Motto

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Motto

A saying inscribed on a coin, especially but not necessarily the official motto of a country. For example, all American coins are inscribed with "In God We Trust," the motto of the United States.
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The downside of the whole situation is that the TV channel that was most adamantly in favour of Sue motto notices may not be happy with the first sue motto of the new Chief Justice, as it is this channel that was able to exclusively broadcast the Full Court Reference.
What's happened over the last several years is that we have had a number of confusing situations in which some people who don't like the motto have tried to convince people not to put it up," Forbes told The New York Times.
From a cracking draw inside middle-running Third Intention, Mottos Banker is capable of leading round the first bend and even in-form Droopys Cristian would find that a daunting task.
The chief master sergeant of the Air Force, the director of Air Force public affairs, the Air Force director of force management policy and the commander of Air Force Recruiting Service provided the leadership oversight for the motto team research experts.
But Councilwoman Sherry Marquez, who was elected in April, said she proposed the motto not to promote religion but rather to reflect patriotism.
THE Big Art Project is taking hold in St Helens as the town searches for a new motto which celebrates it.
Some countries already have this; some like the US motto E Pluribus Unum (Latin for one from many) or the French Liberte, egalite, fraternite (Liberty, equality, fraternity) speak for themselves.
The three-handled vase on the left dates between 1902-1924 and shows an interesting Art Nouveau influence in the shape of the handles; while the salt dish at the front is an example of the sort of item most people associate with the Torquay potteries: motto ware.
Because an 1837 statute governed the mottos and devices that appear on U.
The doubling of the narration of the raid is thus like the proliferating mottos on the Oven: Since no single text, version, or interpretation is adequate, the novel opens up the actuality and the potentiality for multiple perspectives of author, characters, and, Morrison assumes, readers.
But many in the Religious Right went ballistic after a batch of coins was inadvertently produced without the mottos on the edge.