Motto

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Motto

A saying inscribed on a coin, especially but not necessarily the official motto of a country. For example, all American coins are inscribed with "In God We Trust," the motto of the United States.
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In God We Trust" was officially adopted as the national motto by act of Congress in 1956, during the height of the Cold War, and appears on American currency.
The exhaustive research process showed that Airmen share a core set of identity concepts that serve as a basis for an Air Force motto," said Gen.
Lancaster's move comes while Bakersfield City Councilwoman Jacquie Sullivan leads an effort to bring the motto to city halls across the state.
This is just the start of a process which could see the existing Latin motto of Out of Earth Cometh Light permanently replaced with a modern version.
My salt dish bears the not particularly illuminating motto, 'A necessary of life'.
Motto purchased the home on Simsbury Drive in the Stoney Brook Development off Union Deposit Road from Zimmer Grove Homes because it is exactly the kind of place they wanted, it was priced right, and it had features that met their needs.
A sharper motto and an individual cap badge will help.
Whether the motto on the Oven is "Beware the Furrow of His Brow," "Be the Furrow of His Brow," or even "We Are the Furrow of His Brow" or Her Brow, God's brow is not the only one that is furrowed in Toni Morrison's seventh novel, Paradise.
With Ted Soppitt opting to designate William Hill Northern Puppy Derby winner Droopys Kez a railer - likewise Pat Buckley with Irish Derby champion Droopys Noel - Mottos Star will run from trap four in inside wideseeded duo Boherna Best and Deanridge Fury.
Although there was never any evidence that the Mint was considering removing the motto, many Religious Right activists insisted that relegating "In God We Trust" to the edge of the coins was some kind of nefarious plot to ditch the phrase altogether.
TEACHERS at one of Scotland's top schools have gone "PC mad" after they decided to ditch their motto because it contained the word Aids.
If churches had mottos, ``home sweet home'' would be appropriate for Burbank's Church of Religious Science.