Ethics

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Related to moral laws: moralities

Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are few tenets of rant's practical philosophy as obscure and as controversial as his argument in the Critique of Practical Reason that the moral law is valid as a fact of reason (Factum der Vernunft).
They do so because taking the fact of the a priori moral law as the starting-point of a deduction of practical reason seems to: (1) beg the question, (2) imply an uncritical and dogmatic ethical intuitionism, or (3) set up a false equivalence between the models and standards of argumentation for theoretical and practical philosophy.
To be governing, then, moral laws must employ a sufficiently robust notion of moral necessity, where the fulfillment of some (usually non-moral) universal necessitates a particular agential response.
We must now take a brief detour into Murphy's critique of both the natural law and theological voluntarist accounts of moral laws, which is needed to clear the field of rival accounts.
What needs to be clarified and strongly emphasized is that the Moral Law is not the result of public consensus.
A proponent of BST might try to explain the ability of moral laws to support counterfactuals by appealing to David Lewis's theory of counterfactuals (cf.
It is this attempt by Kant to separate his rational moral law from the body and natural inclinations that Lacan calls into question.
Evil consists, for Kant, in the natural human propensity to subordinate the moral law to the incentives of self-love or inclinations.
Moral laws necessarily take the form of imperatives for merely finite rational beings.
This is ironic, since one of the fundamental tenets of pragmatism is the assertion that objectively true moral laws do not exist.
Korsgaard's contribution argues that Kantian laws of autonomy are indeed positive moral laws since only an autonomous moral agent can make a law intrinsically normative.
According to this view, moral reasoning "consist[s] entirely of the bringing of concrete cases under moral laws or rules that specify 'the right thing to do' in any given instance.