money

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Money

Currency and coin that are guaranteed as legal tender by the government, a regulatory agency or bank.

Money

A commodity, asset, or (most commonly) currency that may be exchanged for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government issues its own money and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. Money and the money supply are integral to determining interest rates, inflation, and especially economic growth. There is no uniform agreement as to what qualifies as money; some economists include more mediums of exchange than other economists. Every society throughout history has used some sort of money, even bartering economies traded for something perceived to be equivalent. See also: Money supply, Liquidity.

money

A generally accepted medium for the exchange of goods and services, for measuring value, or for making payments. Many economists consider the amount of money and growth in the amount of money in an economy very influential in determining interest rates, inflation, and the level of economic activity. There is some disagreement among economists as to what types of things actually should be classified as money; for example, should balances in money market funds be included. See also money supply.

money

an asset which is generally acceptable as a means of payment in the sale and purchase of products and other assets and for concluding borrowing and lending transactions. The use of money enables products and assets to be priced in terms of the monetary units of the country (pence and pounds in the UK, for example), and to be exchanged using money as a common medium of exchange rather than the bartering of one product against another. Money also acts as a store of value (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of products and assets, as for example in compiling the country's NATIONAL INCOME accounts). See MONEY SUPPLY, MONETARY POLICY.

money

an ASSET that is generally acceptable as a medium of exchange. Individual goods and services, and other physical assests, are ‘priced’ in terms of money and are exchanged using money as a common denominator rather than one GOOD, etc., being exchanged for another (as in BARTER). The use of money as a means of payment enables an economy to produce more output because it facilitates SPECIALIZATION in production and reduces the time spent by sellers and buyers in arranging exchanges. Other important functions of money are its use as a store of value or purchasing power (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments), a standard of deferred payment (money is used as an agreed measure of future receipts and payments in contracts) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of goods or services, e.g. GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, over time). See LEGAL TENDER.
References in periodicals archive ?
It crossed my mind more than once that penning the adventures of the likes of Spot the Dog and Miffy the Rabbit was money for old rope.
Anyone who considers a bet on Rangers to be money for old rope has not dwelt very long on the happenings at Ross County in midweek when the Glasgow giants were sent off as short as 1-6 to dispose of the First Division strugglers.
Francis said: "If they want to pay money for old rope, that's their business.
I am a prolific reader of reports drawn up by know-all consultants with a string of letters after their names,and I have come to the conclusion that it is often money for old rope.
Some of my friends are models and I've done nothing but give them stick over the years, saying it was money for old rope, but it's not a bad number.
Like most jobs that the general public dismiss as a money for old rope, talking for a living is harder than it sounds.
To get better than 10-11 the three-timer will seem like money for old rope to big-hitters and small-stakes punters alike, and Ladbrokes are bracing themselves for an interesting 90 minutes.
But Mr Draper stressed there was no evidence of "widespread abuse" of the system, and even added: "Most lobbying work consists of money for old rope.
Hardly,and somehow it seems unlikely that, despite Gordon Taylor's posturing, the players would risk their money for old rope just to stand by poor old absent-minded Rio.
At first glance it appears to be money for old rope.