Monarchist

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Monarchist

A person who favors a government headed by a hereditary figure such as a king or queen. Monarchists may believe that a monarchy is preferable to a system in which politicians promote their own interests, instead of those of the state. Others may be culturally or just sentimentally attached to the days when monarchies were more common.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even when evidence of this attitude is provided (more on this below), it is hardly enough to fully allay the doubts of those who are skeptical of the sincerity of popular monarchism.
In The Everlasting Empire Pines ambitiously carries his argument about classical monarchism forward into the first and second millennia C.
The chapter thus suggests that Thailand's law of lese majeste reflects the impossibility of reconciling modern Thai monarchism with liberal politics.
German scholarship emphasised the role of Frederick Barbarossa and French scholarship, as well as offering a justification for French imperialism, was usually linked to strong religious conservatism and monarchism.
16) The executive branch was associated with colonial governments and discredited monarchism, and the drafters of most state constitutions did not have a robust conception of judicial power.
Any democrat, however cool on monarchism, could genuinely join in the good wishes.
Da Ponie's ending is essentially a translation of Beaumarehais' 1787 ending with the notable exception thai any hint of Beauiliarhals' constitutional monarchism is removed: ".
For Frederick Brown, the author of For the Soul of France, the Dreyfus Affair is the culmination of a long cultural war that pitted democracy and science against Roman Catholicism and monarchism.
July 1952 revolution that ended the Monarchism in Egypt.
Guareschi, a journalist, editor, and cartoonist, as well as a writer of fiction, cannot be said to have been a marginal figure; but in terms of the literary mainstream, his monarchism, distrust of modernity, militant Catholicism, strident anti-Communism and avowed anti-intellectualism, as well as the brute fact of his popularity, means that he has remained substantially ignored within the scholarly sphere even as he has found a vast reading public outside it.
For him, the enemy is statism, which over the centuries has taken the form of monarchism, feudalism, militarism, fascism, and communism.