Monarchy

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Monarchy

A system of government headed by a hereditary figure such as a king or queen. There are two basic types of monarchies. In an absolute monarchy, the monarch theoretically has complete control as an autocrat, though in practice other officials have varying degrees of control as well. In a constitutional monarchy, the monarch shares power with an elected chamber or other elected leaders and, in extreme cases, has little actual power.
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These experiences come out of a concoction of 'real' history with a strange infusion of mythic history, and together they occupy the space in which the king stands and ask him to believe in a monarchic power underlain by York's historical support.
One might ponder what sort of cultural or political affinities exist between monarchic Iran or Saudi Arabia and the U.
The rise of Constantine as a monarchic, Christian ruler prompted Christians to consider both the emperor's relationship to God and the relationship between God the Father and God the Son.
There is a widespread impression that the Monarchomaques were deeply anti-royalist, critics of the practice, indeed the very idea, of monarchic authority.
The monarchic person is described as "single minded and driven" (Sternberg, 1997, p.
In the context of the Kingdom proclamation, at March 14th/26th 1881, was necessary the strengthening of the prestige of the monarchic dynasty, without being in any way affected the external one.
A monarchic individual is single-minded and has a driven personality and he or she prefers to eliminate all the obstacles while solving a problem.
Indeed, the documentary seems geared towards the idea that with the end of monarchic rule at the hands of the Egyptian revolutionaries in 1952, a cultural and artistic renaissance was in store for the Egyptian cinema industry, which survived as unsettling a shift as the nationalization of studios and production companies.
These essays explore the common theme among these strikingly different characters: an unswerving loyalty to the idea that moving away from monarchic ideals for the sake of the emergent republic was not only just but essential.
Not for the first time in its history at a contested continental crossroads, Liechtenstein survived a foreign threat, and emerged to build a modern economic and social system but with a monarchic political structure rooted in its past.
Pym stood for parliamentary opposition against the Personal Rule, for religion free of intervention by Catholicism or Canterbury; Wentworth supported Catholic, monarchic, Anglican England.