mint

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Mint

A place where coins are manufactured. In general, the coins produced at a government-sponsored mint are legal tender, though private minted coins may have an intrinsic value due to their metal content. Before fiat money became common, many paper notes were exchangeable for a minted coin containing some specified level of gold or silver.

mint

the organization that has the exclusive right to manufacture and issue BANK NOTES and COINS on the instructions of a government's monetary authorities. In the UK this function is performed by the Royal Mint, part of the BANK OF ENGLAND.
References in classic literature ?
Its price had been a napoleon, and a napoleon, just then, was a mint of money in her eyes.
It might ha' been a trifle thicker an' no harm, an' I allays putten a sprig o' mint in mysen; but how's ye t' know that?
I saluted - but for the life av me I mint to shake hands whin I went in.
Everything looked like money--like the last coin issued from the Mint.
We had an idea at first that only a mint could have survived the expense.
It strikes off money faster than the dies of the Royal Mint itself.
Whatever we paid for in Barkingham was paid for in the genuine Mint coinage.
Katherine's Dock House on Tower Hill, and he informed us that he had a special affection for the view of that historic locality, with the Gardens to the left, the front of the Mint to the right, the miserable tumble-down little houses farther away, a cabstand, boot- blacks squatting on the edge of the pavement and a pair of big policemen gazing with an air of superiority at the doors of the Black Horse public-house across the road.
Says I to the exciseman, says I, I think you oft to favour us; I am sure we are very good friends to the government: and so we are for sartain, for we pay a mint of money to 'um.
The war with Spain, many years' generous mint and watermelon crops, a few long-shot winners at the New Orleans race-track, and the brilliant banquets given by the Indiana and Kansas citizens who compose the North Carolina Society have made the South rather a "fad" in Manhattan.
Our readers may remember the unsigned reports we published relating to the 'Left foot of the Rue Oberkampf,' at the time of the famous robbery of the Credit Universel, and the famous case of the 'Gold Ingots of the Mint.
for ye pay tithe of mint and anise and cummin, and have omitted the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and faith: these ought ye to have done, and not to leave the other undone.