MA

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Related to milliampere: microampere, Milliampere Second

MA

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for MOROCCO.

MA

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Kingdom of Morocco. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Moroccan bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Morocco. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Morocco. Each province has its own code with the prefix "MA." For example, the code for the Province of Ait Baha is ISO 3166-2:MA-BAH.
References in periodicals archive ?
Current is expressed in amperes (A), which are coulombs per second, or more appropriately for surgery, milliamperes (mA), one thousandth of an ampere.
The NSIC2020BT3G, NSIC2030BT3G and NSIC2050BT3G have steady state current (IRegSS) capability of 20 milliamperes (mA), 30 mA and 50 mA, respectively.
To enroll their children, parents or guardians had to sign a contract acknowledging that they would be given electric shocks of up to 200 milliamperes.
Low currents, such as a few 10s of milliamperes (typical of a monitoring or alarm circuit), will not break through the oxides well enough to create a reliable low-resistance current path.
Intensity was recorded in milliamperes (mA) to account for impedance variability, and single pulses were delivered.
The calibrator also measures milliamperes and provides an accuracy of 0.
However, the diode requires a control current on the order of milliamperes.
The proces uses a low-level direct current on the order of milliamperes per sq cm of cross-sectional area between the electrodes or an electric potential difference A few volts per centimeter across electrodes placed in the ground in an open-flow arrangement is sufficient to activate the process.
4 kg) Power requirements Voltage 6 volts DC Current 195 milliamperes Periodic error 26" * All values measured by Sky & Telescope ** Expressed as a percentage of the aperture's diameter
The current required by the cold cathode lamp, basically a small metal tube, is at most 4 milliamperes, which is roughly four thousandths of the current in a 100watt incandescent bulb.
There he machine sat: a massive permanent magnet whirling within a giant copper coil large enough to fill the back of a station wagon, ostensibly receiving energy from an array of batteries providing less than 2 milliamperes of current yet producing enough energy to light up a flickering set of fluorescent and incandescent lights.