Governor

(redirected from military governor)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to military governor: Military government

Governor

1. The head of a bank, especially but not necessarily a central bank. For example, the highest post in the Bank of England is called the Governor.

2. More generally, a term for some chief executives, especially heads of political subdivisions. For example, the head of an American state is called a governor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The meeting was attended by the Chief of Staff of the Libyan army, the head of intelligence and the Military Governor himself, the Libyan news agency reported.
The views expressed in them remain compelling enough a half-century later that erstwhile military governor and ambassador for the Israeli government Elpeleg is called upon to deny against them yet again.
General Leonard Wood, the Military Governor of Cuba, decided to solicit the opinions of Cuba's political elite on the matter, and declared that he would rule based upon the consensus of the majority.
military governor for Germany, and General LeMay requesting C-54s from the United States had caused a flurry of activity at U.
forces in the southwest Pacific in World War II (where he, too, was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor), served as military governor of post-war Japan, and commanded U.
The son of Army General Arthur MacArthur, he spent more than 70 years serving in a variety of leadership positions, including Superintendent of West Point, Chief of Staff of the Army, Field Marshall of the Philippines, Supreme Allied Commander of the Pacific during World War II, Military Governor of Japan during its occupation, and as a presidential hopeful as well as public administrator and businessman.
Zaki Al-Halaby: Rose from cadet to Bikbaasi (Lieutenant Colonel), became Ottoman military governor in Yemen and in 1914 commander of Arab-Ottoman forces in Syria.
I think that's why I have been able to survive the power struggle in the LDP Sengoku era,'' he said, citing Takeda Shingen (1521-1573), a military governor of Kai Province, now Yamanashi Prefecture, as one of the warlords who influenced him.
The city's loss of a precarious independence dated from Henry II's entry in 1552, bringing a vow of protection that fell short at this time of actual incorporation despite the imposition of a military governor and a French garrison.
The local military governor, afraid of potential riots by the determined people, released the visionary from prison.

Full browser ?