MI

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MI

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Midway Islands before their re-designation as part of the U.S. Minor Outlying Islands. This was the code used in international transactions to and from bank accounts in the territory.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for the Midway Islands. This was used as an international standard for shipping to the Midway Islands.

In both cases, the code is obsolete.
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References in classic literature ?
Bowman, finding he could not succeed at this time, retreated about thirty miles.
He objected that the first two miles was a dead level, with plenty of room, and that the rope was never used except in very dangerous places.
Twenty-five hundred miles along a thousand tons of copper wire
We heaved the log, and calculated that the Abraham Lincoln was going at the rate of 18 1/2 miles an hour.
We did not accomplish more than seven miles that day.
If the crust is of sufficient thickness we shall come to a final stop between six and seven hundred miles beneath the earth's surface; but during the last hundred and fifty miles of our journey we shall be corpses.
They failed to make Forty Mile that night, and when they passed that camp next day Daylight paused only long enough to get the mail and additional grub.
Under the glasses the disc appeared at the distance of five miles.
The thick, deep wood which you see in the hollow, about a mile off, surrounds Ashdown Park, built by Inigo Jones.
By evening, the log showed that two hundred and twenty miles had been accomplished from Hong Kong, and Mr.
And looking across space with instruments, and intelligences such as we have scarcely dreamed of, they see, at its nearest distance only 35,000,000 of miles sunward of them, a morning star of hope, our own warmer planet, green with vegetation and grey with water, with a cloudy atmosphere eloquent of fertility, with glimpses through its drifting cloud wisps of broad stretches of populous country and narrow, navy-crowded seas.
This vast region is situated between the fifteenth and tenth degrees of north latitude; that is to say, that, in order to approach it, the explorer must penetrate fifteen hundred miles into the interior of Africa.