middle manager


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middle manager

any manager who occupies a middle position in the HIERARCHY of an ORGANIZATION, located between those senior managers who formulate business strategy and those with direct responsibility for overseeing the work of production or of clerical employees. In practice the term is used imprecisely; it can also refer to those managers who do not contribute directly to the organization's primary output and to those who do not have direct responsibility for budgets or overseeing the work of others (see LINE AND STAFF). In recent years many organizations have sought to reduce the number of their middle managers; information technology has rendered some of their information-processing roles unnecessary, whilst many have claimed that the absence of responsibility has led to poor job performance. See MANAGEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a crucial point to make, as the way the middle manager interprets a strategic issue can affect a wide range of daily activities in a company (Dutton/Duncan 1987, Thomas/McDaniel 1990); hence the middle manager's perspective adopted in this study.
This renewed appreciation for the middle manager has often resulted from efforts to become more "process-based" or "horizontal.
Because middle managers are hands-on people focusing intensely on their narrow piece of turf, they generally lack the time or opportunity to share any business intelligence with other middle managers.
A middle manager in another trust made a similar observation:
One middle manager took on the challenge of implementing and expanding initiatives designed to address serious safety threats to DC drivers and their passengers.
Huy, reporting in the September 2001 issue of The Harvard Business Review, describes a 6-year study of middle managers (Huy, 2001).
When electronic communications became common in organizations, many observers predicted that the role of the middle manager would decline rapidly.
The study by Edwards and colleagues (2013) suggested the source of the stress is social conflict and may help explain studies in humans that have found middle managers suffer the most stress at work.
The importance of cooperation and cohesiveness to be spearheaded by the nurse middle manager has a significant bearing on his/her decision-making which is group consensus.
Gayle Hornaday (Henderson Libraries in Nevada) provides excellent checklists for the new middle manager.
The management training classes that the Management Training Institute is delivering are so highly engaging that the middle manager participants invariably ask when the next management training seminar will be offered.
In this follow-up to Transitioning from Librarian to Middle Manager (2004), Mosley (Texas A&M Evan's Library) addresses the challenges of ongoing change and staff relationships and development, self-development, finding sources of financial support, and managing budgets.