Metric

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Metric

A standard unit of measurement, such as the price to earnings ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cadences of the tristubh (eleven-syllable verse) and jagati (twelve-syllable verse) are metrically the most regular features in the Rigveda.
Metrically, in these two lines, the prevalent pattern would ordinarily be said to be "anapaestic" (where two unstressed syllables are followed by a beat).
My only complaint is that nowadays they stop metrically at 10, instead of going on to 12.
Many need to be scaled up or down to fit metrically.
Although sweets are weighed metrically, as befits EU rules, they are also sold by the quarter with a quarter of an ounce of toffee bonbons costing 69p.
Along the way she restores to this umanista dimenticato a number of conjectures generally credited to later scholars which in her view show "good powers of divination" as being reasonable, even ingenious, paleographically possible, and metrically acceptable.
But he said: "In this case I would guess that the prime influence is Kipling, who is a rather inflexible poet anyway, metrically speaking.
I have a tendency, compositionally, to 'borrow' basslines in popular music, and just experiment with adding notes and taking away notes, which then re-shapes the line metrically.
Williams was to Davie an example of the wrong way out of Whitman, the way of lax poetics and mundane subjects, whereas Tare was an example of the right way of American poetry, whether or not it could really be called Whitmanesque, which was historically attuned and metrically refined.
Nancarrow metrically and rhythmically undermines any potential predictability a 4:5 ratio might have.
A crash course for the metrically uninitiated: the substitution-free iambic pentameter line the fossil bears the stamp of fin or leaf--in which each of the five, two-syllable feet are made up of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one--with a first-foot trochaic substitution would read: Fossils may bear the stamp of fin or leaf The same line with a third-foot trochee would read: The fossil's world, dying and lost, now lives.
What is said of Genesis A, 'While the poem must be early on linguistic grounds, it is metrically inexact', uses 'must be' too absolutely, though many would agree that it and Exodus are earlier than Beowulf.