Metric

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Metric

A standard unit of measurement, such as the price to earnings ratio.
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In the sections "The Onegin Stanza: The Quality of Rhyme" and "The Onegin Stanza: Deviations from the Metrical Template," we discuss the general properties of rhyme and meter in the Onegin stanza.
Auden indeed gives thanks for meter as a much-needed check on the self: "Blessed be all metrical rules that forbid automatic responses, / force us to have second thoughts, free us from the fetters of self.
The United Presbyterian Mission committees charged with preparing metrical psalms, however, "oscillated between the adoption of Eastern and Western meters.
Hall's "Introduction: A Great Multiplication of Meters" delves into what he describes as the "supernumerary syllables" of metrical matters not otherwise explored in the collection.
book--the Metrical Meditations one--to Ravenswood Rd [the home of Janie Moore in Bristol]--I have yielded to oft repeated suggestions that it should go there.
In several of the exile communities metrical psalms were incorporated in English forms of worship being developed under Lutheran and Calvinistic influence.
In the new study, researchers at Cambridge have shown, using a music task, that this is linked to a broader difficulty in perceiving rhythmic patterns, or metrical structure.
Metrical patterns function on two levels in Frasca's work: as the crystallization in verse of experience (at all levels: everyday, political, amorous, but also sensorial) and as a screen, or frame, which controls linguistic flow.
With over 150 Elizabethan editions, this metrical psalter and its predecessors were "some of the best-selling evangelical literature" and provided many of the "best-known translations of scripture" (5).
They claim that the poetic form, from which we can judge the nationality, the time, the content orientation, and the style of a verse, is the most prominent feature of a poem; that the language used in metrical verse is quantified; and whether a translation is faithful to and to what extent it follows the original can be observed from its outer form.
Metrical and rhyming verse made these kinds of bodily engagements natural, but free verse lends itself more sparingly to physical activity.
The discussion continues with the contribution of Michel Jourde, who shows that even Ronsard, despite his doctrinaire attitude, could not keep his own rules: he may pride himself on his art, but metrical errors occur and (following Horace) he avows chat he is following a "sentier inconnu" (58).