Meritocracy

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Meritocracy

A system in which the best qualified persons are rewarded for their achievements. That is, talent and hard work are rewarded in a meritocracy, rather than other factors like personal relationships or tenure. Meritocracy in a corporation may cause better results, but certain positions are still commonly kept within a family or friendship network.
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Past research has revealed gender and race pay disparities in organizations that emphasize meritocratic procedures, even when controlling for human capital (e.
Far from being subject to false consciousness by supporting liberal political candidates, members of the meritocratic class are acting in a rational and deliberate fashion.
In particular, "the army's new meritocratic personnel procedures, including but not limited to intelligence testing, gave leadership opportunities [such as officer rank to command immigrant companies] to educated ethnic Americans," (18).
The scheme will also promote meritocratic culture, as bonuses and remuneration will be performance-related.
James Willoughby says that "horses should be allotted their chance according to a meritocratic system".
This sends a loud and clear message that Libya is a meritocratic society - rewarding the best people for their best but rightful efforts.
So far, this seems obviously on board with what a meritocratic approach to levelling the playing field requires, insofar as it is targeted towards levelling the playing field with respect to access and towards balancing opportunities which result from unchosen differences in people's circumstances, and not targeted toward levelling the differences between people based on their own choices.
Many current and former college and high school administrators provide information to me because they believe that college admissions should be fair and meritocratic and they're deeply troubled by preferences for children of alumni and donors and other privileged groups.
A few weeks before, the House of Lords--once a rubber-stamp hereditary body of eccentrics, since reformed by Blair into a more meritocratic and relevant legislature--had restricted the prime minister's ban on "inciting religious hatred" by forcing prosecutors to prove malicious intent and adding a provision recognizing the right to "ridicule, insult, or abuse" other religions.
As described by Elena Galinova in her recent doctoral dissertation from The Pennsylvania State University (The Construction of Meritocracy Within Mass Higher Education: Organizational Dynamics of Honors Programs at American Colleges and Universities, 2005), these two cultural beliefs include: (1) the egalitarian notion that a college education should be the right of every American citizen regardless of wealth or social standing; and (2) the equally strong notion of a meritocratic system whereby the ".
But maintaining a "sense of historical continuity," as Bowen calls it, is hardly as compelling an interest as a more meritocratic campus and society.
Labour promises to make Britain a more prosperous and meritocratic country and to embed "irreversible change" in the public services, leaving them "safe for a generation".