Meritocrat


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Meritocrat

A person who believes that the best qualified persons should be rewarded for their achievements. That is, talent and hard work are rewarded in a meritocracy, rather than other factors like personal relationships or tenure. Meritocracy in a corporation may cause better results, but certain positions are still commonly kept within a family or friendship network.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not so much Donald Trump-his wealth may rankle, but his crudity is a great consolation; meritocrats don't really want to be Donald Trump.
But most of the meritocrats, like Munger in the beginning, took the perks and ran, seeking the time-honored American prerogatives of success for themselves and their families.
But now they are trying to prove they can succeed as meritocrats.
The meritocrats, meanwhile, need to display real skill to get to the top where they then achieve helplessness as the reward for former know-how.
According to the American journalist, David Brooks, they are bourgeois bohemians, a new elite of well-heeled meritocrats whose values and lifestyle draw on two apparently antagonistic traditions: the idealism of the '60s and the materialism of the '80s.
That America's meritocrats have started adopting beatnik ideas is hardly surprising.
So far she is almost unique among frontline politicians in daring to mouth it but behind the scenes there are many meritocrats who find the concept alluring.
Both are meritocrats of modest birth whose political roots are on the left (Obama was a community organizer in Chicago, Clinton ran George McGovern's presidential campaign in Texas) who, for reasons of political and programmatic pragmatism, embraced policies outside the traditional liberal framework.
There's a danger in all this for Obama and his fellow meritocrats in the administration.
American meritocrats like to think of themselves as believing in equality of opportunity.
As a general rule, meritocrats prefer things that can be described with words like "authentic" or "understated" or quality" or old," so long as they aren't seedy; they also have a weakness for well-designed hightech stuff.
Also, in the case of the Lifer track, meritocrats stay away because over the last generation they've developed a contempt for organizational life, and their dream of success is now symbolized by those magazine ads in which the guy is sitting alone on a mountaintop with his notebook computer.