Meritocracy


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Meritocracy

A system in which the best qualified persons are rewarded for their achievements. That is, talent and hard work are rewarded in a meritocracy, rather than other factors like personal relationships or tenure. Meritocracy in a corporation may cause better results, but certain positions are still commonly kept within a family or friendship network.
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Concerning theological contradiction and complementarity between meritocracy and amitacracy in the case of Fromm's "Art of Loving," we see that (1) the experience of union with all men, of human solidarity and of human atonement, (2) care, and (5) knowledge are the mutual essence in both meritocracy and amitacracy.
Consistent with their assumptions about the underlying mechanisms, the paradox of meritocracy was more evident in allocation of bonuses (which are normally private) than in decisions that usually are more visible (e.
It is hard to imagine a meritocracy in place in North America.
1) Competition for money must include a robust welfare state or it is not fair; (2) Money rewards create a tension between what society wants and what I want to do to realize my own chosen excellence; (3) Unless the penalties for not acceding to what society wants are draconian (and they cannot be if the competition is to be fair), it will fall short of a even a bastard meritocracy.
Along with the well-known cases of China and Korea, Woodside's choice includes Vietnam for its practiced meritocracy after the Chinese model, but excludes Japan for its persistent retention of the hereditary power of the samurai into the mid-nineteenth century.
The thesis of my remarks is that the ambiguous status of the concept of meritocracy and its author resides in the rise and fall of a socialist Britain; or perhaps more accurately stated as the inability of twentieth-century "hard labour" to eradicate nineteenth-century soft capitalism.
Pure meritocracy can lead to unchecked competition, as Michael Young's provocative novel of 1958 showed, while the limits of credentialism were outlined in the even more famous Wizard of Oz (1900).
Like spelling bees, the contest for valedictorian offers a pleasing image of a purer meritocracy, in which learning and performing by the rules leave one hardworking person standing.
It's very competitive, but spaces are awarded on a strict meritocracy.
Dell is a meritocracy," says John Hood, chief executive of the company's call center in Panama.