merchant


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merchant

a business such as a RETAILER or WHOLESALER which acts as an intermediary in a DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL. Merchants ‘take title’ to goods (that is, purchase goods) which they then on-sell to customers.
References in classic literature ?
But," said the merchant, "How can I have killed your son?
No," said the genius, "I shall kill you as you killed my son," and so saying, he seized the merchant by the arm, threw him on the ground, and lifted his sabre to cut off his head.
Let the rate be, even with the merchant himself, somewhat more easy than that he used formerly to pay; for by that means, all borrowers, shall have some ease by this reformation, be he merchant, or whosoever.
On the other side, the commodities of usury are, first, that howsoever usury in some respect hindereth merchandizing, yet in some other it advanceth it; for it is certain that the greatest part of trade is driven by young merchants, upon borrowing at interest; so as if the usurer either call in, or keep back, his money, there will ensue, presently, a great stand of trade.
When they are paid by the merchant they operate as an additional tax upon the importing State, whose citizens pay their proportion of them in the character of consumers.
Then the merchant told him how all his wealth was gone to the bottom of the sea, and how he had nothing left but that little plot of land.
But Father Sergius recovered immediately, and though very pale, he waved the merchant and the deacon aside and continued to chant the service.
Now would ensue a brisk traffic with the merchants, and all Montreal would be alive with naked Indians running from shop to shop, bargaining for arms, kettles, knives, axes, blankets, bright-colored cloths, and other articles of use or fancy; upon all which, says an old French writer, the merchants were sure to clear at least two hundred per cent.
Within an hour the merchant, stroking his big overcoat neatly down, and hooding up his jacket, with the agreement in his pocket, seated himself in his tightly covered trap, and drove homewards.
Now in the case of (1) the Merchant, what shall I see?
His father, John Chaucer, was a London wine merchant.
As became known later, he had scarcely begun to address the merchants before tears gushed from his eyes and he concluded in a trembling voice.