mercantilism

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mercantilism

a set of economic ideas and policies that became established in England during the 17th century, accompanying the rise of commercial capitalism. The mercantilists stressed the importance of trade and commerce as the source of the nation's wealth, and advocated policies to increase a nation's wealth and power by encouraging exports and discouraging imports in order to allow the country to amass quantities of GOLD. These protectionist ideas (see PROTECTIONISM) were criticized by later classical economists like Adam SMITH.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yoruba, Aja-Fon, and Bantu) and was largely influenced by the chattel slavery and mercantilistic context from which it emerged during the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries (Harding, 2000; Krippner, 2008; Van De Port, 2005).
the public shame attached to mercantilistic practices and foreign exchange manipulation for trade advantages
defined by the mercantilistic pressures exerted by polls and public
From a different perspective, the celebrated economist Adam Smith's essential argument, buttressed by a brilliantly original economic analysis and which is highly relevant in the present times where there is rampant bureaucratic redtapism and bureaucrats evading responsibilities in crises, was that the bureaucratic controls of the eighteenth century mercantilistic system were poisoning the well springs of economic progress.
The desire to accumulate large amounts of specie led to the development of the balance of trade principle, which would be essential to mercantilistic economic policies.
These empires were furthermore highly centralized, authoritarian, corporative, mercantilistic, scholastic, patrimonial, seigniorial, and warlike.
The ideals and interests were changing: it was necessary to produce and not only look for merchandises, as unfortunately and sadly slaves were seen in the mercantilistic society since the XV century.
The British also imposed some mercantilistic restrictions that contributed to the Revolutionary War, but Spanish policies were more restrictive.
We came under the control of Spain and Portugal at a time when those two countries were heavily corporatist, heavily mercantilistic.
It was the militarized mercantilistic explorations by the Portuguese in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth century that led to the deliberate destruction of these integrated city-states.