menace


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menace

(1) A threat of violence used to secure a contract. Such a contract can be set aside, just as a contract secured by duress. (2) A threat of violence to another, such as a trespasser. Some state statutes allow the use of force to protect one's home,but do not include the ability to menace another in order to protect one's home.

References in classic literature ?
This third menace was too much for the game spirit of John Day.
in order to arrest this haughty, arrogant Titan who, true to his menace, threatens to scale my heaven.
At her hip was a pistol--a formidable weapon with which to face a man; but a puny thing indeed with which to menace the great beast before her.
Here we were free from the attacks of the large land carnivora; but the smaller flying reptiles, the snakes, leopards, and panthers were a constant menace, though by no means as much to be feared as the huge beasts that roamed the surface of the earth.
While he, with his slashing buccaneer methods, was a distinct menace to the more orthodox financial gamblers, he was nevertheless so grave a menace that they were glad enough to leave him alone.
He was an animal, lacking in intelligence and spirit, a menace and a thing of fear, as the tiger and the snake are menaces and things of fear, better behind the bars of a cage than running free in the open.
Their policy is to print nothing that is a vital menace to the established.
He could only think of her as triumphant, successful in her menace of a wholly useless remorse never to be effaced.
I had been hopelessly in the wrong before, but this man's menaces were putting me in the right.
To the menaces and mysteries of his surroundings the consciousness was an added horror.
And so it was that little Tibo cringed not only from real menaces but from imaginary ones.
In these Mrs Western herself began to talk to her in a more peremptory stile than before: but her father treated her in so violent and outrageous a manner, that he frightened her into an affected compliance with his will; which so highly pleased the good squire, that he changed his frowns into smiles, and his menaces into promises: he vowed his whole soul was wrapt in hers; that her consent (for so he construed the words, "You know, sir, I must not, nor can, refuse to obey any absolute command of yours") had made him the happiest of mankind.