cell

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cell

an independent team of operatives who work together in a CELLULAR MANUFACTURING production environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
On histopathological examination of the cutaneous lesions, mast cell accumulation is observed along the papillary dermis and reticular dermis and inside the subcutaneous adipose tissue (23).
Patients typically experienced, at best, a nearly 60% drop in bone marrow mast cell burden and serum tryptase.
Berman, "The zebrafish reveals dependence of the mast cell lineage on Notch signaling in vivo," Blood, vol.
Hp infection positivity was seen to be influential in the inflammatory process by increasing mast cell density.
The mean mast cell counts in acute appendicitis, chronic appendicitis, and normal appendix were found to be 30.
Type 3 variant: the use of mast cell stabilisers in association with steroids and antihistamines is recommended.
There are 2 main forms of mast cell activation: primary and secondary.
The exact mechanism by which this inhibition is accomplished is not completely understood, but the following details of cromolyn activity and mast cell function are known:
A 2004 systematic review of 40 RCTs (total N not provided) assessed the efficacy of topical treatment with mast cell stabilizers and antihistamines, comparing each with the other and placebo.
Their activation results in various intra-cellular effects, such as protein phosphorylation, calcium ions intracellular mobilization, and activator factors transcription, resulting mast cell degranulation and the induction of newly formed lipid mediators release [16, 17].
However, practices among different laboratories and clinicians are varied and CDUE is a diverse group of diseases with many causes for which increased mast cell activity may not be expected to contribute to all or even a majority of these cases.
Studies have shown that some mast cell tumors have a defect in their DNA that causes a tyrosine kinase receptor--a protein on the cell's surface that signals the cell to grow and survive--to be on all the time, which leads to cells multiplying uncontrollably," says Cheryl Balkman, DVM, ACVIM, senior lecturer and chief of oncology at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.