manipulate

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Manipulation

The attempt or act to artificially change the price of a security or a market movement with the intent to make a profit. One example is wash selling, in which an investor both sells then quickly re-buys the same security, hoping to create the impression of increased trading volume, and therefore raise the price. Another is churning, in which an investor makes both buy and sell orders through different brokers to create the impression of increased interest in the security and raise the price. Manipulation can be used to both increase and decrease prices, depending on the investor's perceived needs. Manipulation is illegal under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. See also: Antitrust, Fix.

manipulate

To cause a security to sell at an artificial price. Although investment bankers are permitted to manipulate temporarily the stock they underwrite, most other forms of manipulation are illegal.
Case Study Manipulation of security prices is not limited to industry professionals out for a quick buck. In early 2001 the Securities and Exchange Commission settled securities fraud charges with former burrito vendor Yun Soo Oh Park IV, known to his Internet followers as "Tokyo Joe." As part of the settlement Park agreed to return nearly a quarter of a million dollars in trading profits. According to SEC charges, to which Park did not admit or deny wrongdoing, the 50-year-old Korean native engaged in stock manipulation by recommending on Internet message boards stocks he already owned. He then sold his own shares as the recommended stocks rose in price. As Park's legend grew several thousand people agreed to pay an annual fee to receive an advance notice of his postings. The SEC also charged that Park was paid by a firm to recommend its stock. Park's lawyers claimed their client's actions were protected by free speech and not subject to federal securities regulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
2002) (discussing the manipulability of a variety of real-market
Chris clearly adapted her exploratory procedures to these manipulability characteristics, which supports the outcomes of other studies (Lederman & Klatzky, 1987; Schellingerhout et al.
A chapter on "Margaret Cavendish's Double Perception: Affective Technics and Biopolitical Fictions" seems to follow on Milton's articulation of the fears about the manipulability of perspectives of a present political reality to Cavendish's imagining of implementing a new program for intellectual inquiry (82).
Furthermore, the manipulability of the standard opens the Court to criticism that the implied right is or is not applied in accordance with the moral preferences of the justices, rather than well-reasoned and well-grounded doctrine.
Described by Romney as being rare, in 'the CGI age', in its 'awareness of the complexity of meaning that accompanies' the 'new manipulability of images', (40) the film can be seen to flag its ontological concerns during its opening ferry scene, which is in part played out before a computer-generated version of 'unconvincing' back projection.
Economides may risk accusations of naive idealism, not to mention obliviousness to the manipulability of photography.
Sedgwick notes further, "The result of men's accession to this double bind [of homosocial desire] is, first, the acute manipulability, through the fear of one's own 'homosexuality,' of acculturated men; and second, a reservoir of potential for violence caused by the self-ignorance that this regime constitutively enforces" (186).
Sedgwick identifies two results of the masculine double bind: "[f]irst, the acute manipulability, through the fear of one's own homosexuality, of acculturated men; and second, a reservoir of potential for violence caused by the self-ignorance that this regime constitutively enforces.
Film manipulability is in fact not only relative to historical practices of projection (how films are circulated and made known to audiences), but also to the material nature of film itself.
While near singularity configurations robot's mobility is greatly reduced (small velocities in the operational space will generate very large velocities in joint space), Yoshikawa's manipulability model was used to determine if the robot arm is close to a singularity situation, defined as:
Allan Gibbard, Manipulability of Voting Schemes: A General Result, 41
Frequent Manipulability of Elections: The Case of Two Voters.