straw man

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straw man

One who purchases real property in his or her own name and then holds it for sale to the person who supplied the money for the sale,the intended ultimate purchaser.The technique is often used when a well-known developer,or even a large local property owner such as a hospital or university,wishes to conceal its identity so sellers do not raise their prices.

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For an hour the procession of grotesques passed before the eyes of the old man, and then, although it was a painful thing to do, he crept out of bed and began to write.
You young dog," said the man, licking his lips, "what fat cheeks you ha' got.
The governor lowered the staff, and as he did so the old man who had the stick handed it to the other old man to hold for him while he swore, as if he found it in his way; and then laid his hand on the cross of the staff, saying that it was true the ten crowns that were demanded of him had been lent him; but that he had with his own hand given them back into the hand of the other, and that he, not recollecting it, was always asking for them.
We should not give a more appropriate account of the individual man by stating the species to which he belonged, than we should of an individual horse by adopting the same method of definition.
Monsieur d'Arminges," said De Guiche, "remain beside this unfortunate man and see that he is removed as gently as possible.
Here, was another great man," remarked Laurence, pointing to the portrait of John Adams.
Gathergold's bedchamber, especially, made such a glittering appearance that no ordinary man would have been able to close his eyes there.
For men are too cunning, to suffer a man to keep an indifferent carriage between both, and to be secret, without swaying the balance on either side.
I am fully prepared to allow the shy young man that virtue: he is constant in his love.
And thus much to show whether the virtue of a good man and an excellent citizen is the same, or if it is different, and also how far it is the same, and how far different.
It is right and beautiful in any man to say, 'I will take this coat, or this book, or this measure of corn of yours,'--in whom we see the act to be original, and to flow from the whole spirit and faith of him; for then that taking will have a giving as free and divine; but we are very easily disposed to resist the same generosity of speech when we miss originality and truth to character in it.
For seven days and nights they hunted through the forest glades, but never saw so much as a single man in Lincoln green; for tidings of all this had been brought to Robin Hood by trusty Eadom o' the Blue Boar.