MAD

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MAD

The ISO 4217 currency code for the Moroccan Dirham.

MAD

ISO 4217 code for the Moroccan dirham. It was introduced in 1960, replacing the Moroccan franc. It is illegal to export locally circulating dirhams.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Such an idealist 'looks up', even when he is back down in the world of shadows; but then comes something that particularly interests us in this essay about a new praise of folly: he is mocked by ordinary people and considered a madman.
That basically grew over a period of years to become Madman.
The failure to put this madman away for good can only raise questions about who exactly is complicit in the horrors we are seeing every day.
Many readers do not know what to make out of the story of blowing up the dog: they write that the madman that blows up the dog is an allegory of something else.
His administration praises the Communist regime of North Korean madman Kim Jong II--leader of an economic basket case, as well as a human rights hellhole--as a model for Venezuela's development.
But Bush didn't need to "take the word of a madman.
Yet there is no need to go halfway around the world to find the resurrection of the madman theory.
Following a panel presentation of the synopsis of Diary of a Madman by one group of students, the second group developed a case for an appropriate diagnosis, clinical picture, etiology, and prognosis for Axenty Ivanov by documenting key indicators on a flip chart.
It is most unlikely that anyone today or, apart from Anthony Eden, at the time would really consider Nasser an example of an irrational madman.
He was the smallest man on the floor at 5-6, and a disciple of the legendary Butler College coach, Tony Hinkle, who believed it was the sacred duty of every basketball player to nurse the ball tenderly, pass it carefully after much thought, and, shoot it only when wide open, and then hit the board like a madman.
A satisfying short story uses its tight focus on a single narrative to tackle broader issues, and most of the stories in Diverse Lives are, like "The Madman," concerned with the social effects of Indonesia's New Order government of the 1980s and 1990s.
The madman "is full of ideas, writes crazily and perhaps rather sloppily, gets carried away by enthusiasm and desire, and if really let loose, could turn out 10 pages an hour.