Ground

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Ground

A customary unit of area approximately equivalent to 203 square meters. It is used in real estate transactions in some parts of India.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given that blacks and whites have relatively little overlap in the schools they attend, differences in school quality could well explain why black students are losing ground.
Appropriately for a book bearing a 1984 publication date, Losing Ground proposed that the best way to help the poor, therefore, is simply to eliminate all social support.
As the above passage from Losing Ground indicates, Murray had nothing but scorn for a well-intentioned liberal elite that professed compassion for the underclass but doomed its members to permanent dependency by expecting nothing of them.
Drawing on the masculinist tradition of Western philosophy--including Sartre, Camus, Plato, Nietzsche, Kant, Hegel, and Descartes--as a subtext, Losing Ground systematically deconstructs notions of race, class, and gender as it explores black feminine ontology via a middle-class black female protagonist.
In its traditional profit line--mainframe computers--IBM is losing ground to rivals like Amdahl and Fujitsu.
Bar soaps maintain the largest share of market at slightly under 50%, but they are steadily losing ground to liquid soaps, shower gels, and products enhanced with anti-stress agents and aromatherapy benefits.
Share prices on the Tokyo Stock Exchange ended mixed Wednesday, with some high-tech companies advancing but major banks losing ground after meeting with sales after recent gains.
So he's probably losing ground with each passing year.
On that spectrum, the common mistake has been to cast the argument of Losing Ground in terms of stereotypes that are often used by people who make similar points.
The result could mean losing ground to competitors eager to succeed in the income distribution business.
Now - despite holdouts who don't consider themselves dressed without an extra inch or two spiked beneath their feet - the high heel is losing ground as a woman's work wardrobe staple.