Long-Term Interest Rate

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Long-Term Interest Rate

An interest rate on a financial instrument with a maturity of longer than one year. A long-term interest rate is usually (but not always) higher than a short-term rate because of the added risk of committing capital to a person or project for such a long period of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Long-term interest rates also fell in 1992 and in early 1993, as inflation expectations gradually moderated and optimism developed about a potential for genuine progress in reducing federal budget deficits.
1 percent issue, the main barometer of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at 1.
At the same time, our amortization expense has stayed relatively high as range-bound long-term interest rates have perpetuated strong refinancing activity.
The Federal Reserve has contributed to this progress by easing the stance of monetary policy in a measured fashion and thus helping to encourage appreciable declines in long-term interest rates.
Nonetheless, key sectors of the economy, such as defense spending and commercial real estate, remained weak and a back-up in long-term interest rates, owing in part to lagging savings and strong demand for credit by the Treasury, threatened to limit gains in housing and business investment.
long-term interest rates and incoming data that were seen as pointing to some slowing of the expansion in the United States.
Crumrine, Chairman of the Board of the Funds, said "The dividend reductions reflect the continuing changes in the relationship between the levels of short-term and long-term interest rates.
long-term interest rates and the yen's downtrend, as well as gains in Tokyo stocks.
From a pension perspective, the story mid way through 2014 has been a tug-of-war between long-term interest rates and equity markets.
Federal Reserve scaling back its stimulus on Japan's long-term interest rates, the minutes of their policy meeting last month showed Friday.
Although they aren't complaining, what hasn't made much sense to healthcare borrowers is how long-term interest rates have managed to resist persistent efforts by the Federal Reserve Board to use monetary policy initiatives to nudge rates higher across the board.

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