lockout

(redirected from lockouts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Lock-Out

The act of an employer not permitting its employees to work. That is, an employer may close down its place of business (such as a factory) so that employees cannot work and thereby earn a living. Lock-outs are useful in situations such as when a union only represents a portion of a company's workforce. If the employer believes the union is making unreasonable demands, it can declare a lock-out to encourage non-union workers to put pressure on the union workers to give up on those demands. Because this has the effect of punishing all workers, lock-outs are usually illegal.

lockout

an action taken by an employer that involves the exclusion of the workforce from their place of work as part of an INDUSTRIAL DISPUTE. See INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, STRIKE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Almost under any circumstances, we have to see through what's going to happen with the lockout.
To better address our customers' need for integration, we created a safety tagging system that works within Maximo," explained William Wood, product developer for STS and Lockout Tagout Manager.
Anderson's observation about the lawfulness of strikes and lockouts is important, because it indicates that the apparent lawfulness or otherwise of strikes and lockouts has frequently been a minor determinant of whether or not stoppages occur.
It has caused a few problems when our company has been recommended to someone, and they have contacted Lockout 1 instead.
Yet despite the fact that the action was addressed relatively quickly, the economic losses resulting from the lockout were estimated to have cost the American economy in excess of $1 billion per day.
Whatever your company's contingency plan is for dealing with the inconvenience and logistical snafus that safe and vault lockouts can cause, put them on paper in a logical, step-by-step order.
Once fitted, the lockout can be held in place with an Iso-lok padlock.
India is one country that has, since 1961, distinguished between strikes and lockouts in its official collection of data on industrial disputes.
The lockout of 252 union workers commenced at the company's main refinery in Pasadena, Texas, on February 5, 1996.
Accordingly, Section 2 seeks to contextualise the evidence of the recent relative rise in lockouts by comparing some aspects of the recent experience discussed in Briggs with that of earlier years.
The fees can range from $2,500 to $15,000 per day and aren't automatically waived because of lockouts, said John Holloway, a maritime law attorney in Norfolk, Va.
CN (NYSE:CNI) (TSX:CNR) said today the Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) has been asked by the Canadian government to determine whether specific rail services should be maintained in Canada in the event of strikes or lockouts involving three of the company's unions.