LP

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Related to lipoprotein lipase: Lipoprotein lipase deficiency

LP

Limited Partnership

A business model in which at least one general partner and at least one limited partner share a business' ownership. In a limited partnership, the general partner does not usually make invest any capital, but has management authority and unlimited liability. That is, the general partner runs the business and, in the event of bankruptcy, is responsible for all debts not paid or discharged. The limited partners have no management authority and confine their participation to their capital investment. That is, limited partners invest a certain amount of money and have nothing else to do with the business. However, their liability is limited to the amount of the investment. In the worst case scenario for a limited partner, he/she loses what he/she invested. Profits are divided between general and limited partners according to an arrangement formed at the creation of the partnership.
References in periodicals archive ?
We're attempting to knock out each gene by itself and see what happens and what the consequences are with respect to lipoprotein lipase and its ability to remain attached to the endothelium and function in removing lipids from plasma," he says.
Mechanistically, these findings are easy to understand, as lipoprotein lipase hydrolyses triglycerides contained in chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoprotein (17).
This autosomal recessive disorder affects about one in a million persons and is caused by defective plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity.
The most common genetic cause of FCS is a defect in the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene, which results in extremely low levels of LPL activity and a significant reduction in the breakdown of triglycerides.
The activity of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase increased significantly in contrast to the activities of lipoprotein lipase and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase.
uniQure's Glybera, a gene therapy for the treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been approved in the European Union, and is the first approved gene therapy in the Western world.
In fact, the first gene therapy medicine ever approved by the European Medicines Agency, named Glybera, makes use of adeno-associated vectors to treat a metabolic disease caused by a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase and the resulting accumulation of triglycerides in the blood.
To test the cross-reactivity of the ELISA with other lipase members, including lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL), we purchased recombinant human LPL protein from BioVendor and generated recombinant human HTGL as follows.
A specific strategy that accomplishes this is the inhibition of an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which normally acts on triglycerides within lipoproteins, breaking them down into free fatty acids to be stored as fat.

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