Sector

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Sector

Used to characterize a group of securities that are similar with respect to maturity, type, rating, industry, and/or coupon.

Sector

A set of securities or individual companies that are similar to each other. For example, all automotive companies in the United States are said to belong to the American automotive sector. See also: Industry.

sector

A group of securities (such as airline stocks) that share certain common characteristics. Stocks that are particularly interest-sensitive are considered a sector.

Sector.

A sector is a segment of the economy that includes companies providing the same types of products or services.

For example, the utility sector provides electric power, natural gas, water, or a combination of these services. This sector may also include companies who produce power and those that trade it.

Companies within a sector tend to be reasonably consistent in their average earnings per share, price/earnings ratios (P/Es), and other fundamentals. But fundamentals may differ substantially from one sector to another. For example, some sectors are cyclical, rising and falling with changes in the economy while others are defensive, maintaining their strength despite economic ups and downs.

Since there's no official list of sectors, there can be confusion about how many sectors there are, what they're called, and what companies are included in them. For example, transportation is sometimes a standalone sector and sometimes included as part of the industrial sector.

Sector indexes, some of which are broad while others are very narrow, track many of the major sectors of the economy.

sector

a part of the economy that has certain common characteristics that enable it to be separated from other parts of the economy for analytical or policy purposes. A broad division may be made, for example, between economic activities undertaken by the state (the PUBLIC SECTOR) and those that are undertaken by private individuals and businesses (the PRIVATE SECTOR). The private sector, in turn, may be subdivided into the PERSONAL SECTOR (private individuals and households), the CORPORATE SECTOR (businesses supplying goods and services) and the FINANCIAL SECTOR (businesses providing financial services).
References in periodicals archive ?
The end-of-period payoff to line of business k is therefore well defined based on this equal priority as
If we let the value of the exchange option allocated to line of business k be denoted by [D.
The value of the insolvency exchange option for each line of business "adds up" to the total insurer value.
There is no unique way to do this since the allocation of assets to line of business is an internal insurer allocation that will have no economic impact on the payoffs or risks of the insurer since assets are available to meet the losses of all lines of business.
Both employees therefore provide services to Employer A's tire and automotive products line of business within the meaning of Treas.
A line of business is deemed to have its own separate management if at least 80 percent of the top-paid employees provide their services exclusively to that line.
The percentage represents the number of top-raid employees who devote substantial services to the line of business in relation to all top-paid employees who provide any services to the line of business.
Of the 1,000 employees who constitute the top 10 percent by compensation of these 10,000 employees, 930 are substantial-service employees with respect to that line of business.
Another approach is to adopt a de minimis test, which would provide that if employees in common support functions comprise less than, say, five percent of the total controlled group workforce, they should not be counted as providing services to any line of business.
The employer may not, however, exclude any nonresident alien who does not provide services exclusively to any line of business.
414(r)-3(b)(5) requires a line of business to have separate management to qualify as a separate line of business.
Specifically, defining management of a line of business based solely on the compensation of employees providing any services of the line of business -- regardless of whether the employee is truly vested with discretionary, decision-making authority -- is a crude and arbitrary measure of separate management.