Limit

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Limit

Limit

1. The maximum amount of price change a futures contract is allowed to undergo on a given trading day. Limits are mandated by the exchanges on which futures contracts trade, and exist in order to reduce volatility in the market. It is also called a trading limit.

2. The maximum number of transactions in commodities that an individual may make on an exchange on a given trading day. Limits are mandated either by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission or by the exchanges on which commodity contracts trade. It is also called a trading limit.

3. See: Limit order.
References in periodicals archive ?
If 12 years are so vital for elected officials to gain the "necessary" experience, why extend legislative term limits but not statewide office limits?
Conversely, the party supplying additional insured coverage must be sure that: (a) all defense costs are paid "outside" of the limits of liability; or (b) its defense obligation is capped at a reasonable amount.
This is essentially the same result that occurs, for example, if either shareholder faces a loss limit due to insufficient basis or the PAL rules in S status; unused S losses or excess PALs also carry forward for use against future income.
The annual Limit for defined benefits is $175,000 for retirement ages 62-65.
The term limits lobby began scoring victories at the polls in 1990, when voters in three states approved ballot initiatives capping the terms of their local, state, and/or federal officials.
Spring and fall runoff in mountainous areas is already laden with sediment, and that water must be stored and allowed to settle much longer than under current limits.
It is unwise to afford lower limits than the insured needs.
You might, for example, set target prices for some or all of the stocks you own and place limit orders at those levels.
Even if you believe it is intrinsically good to shuffle the decks in the legislatures every couple of years, term limits have been, at most, a partial success.
Term limits are a potent populist expression of the perception that we are not being governed by our consent.
For instance, Fay notes, OSHA cited no scientific studies to justify its new limits on vegetable-oil mists or fumes from aluminum welding.
You see, just keeping track of when you exceed your limits doesn't do much for you--by that time you've already produced sand that isn't within specification.