Mortality Table

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Mortality Table

In actuarial analysis, a table of the likelihood a person of a certain age will die in the next year. This is important in determining one's eligibility for some insurance and annuity plans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the PSID is without question the best available data set for the life table analysis presented in this article, it is not without drawbacks.
Life table for adult Isle Royale moose based on skeletal remains collected from 1958 to 1993.
Calculating cohort life tables requires using parameters in equations 5 and 6 to solve monthly difference equations.
In 1982, after completing a major study of worklife methodology, the BLS published its first set of increment-decrement, or multistate, working life tables for the years 1970 and 1977.
However, by using the models according to Equations 1 and 2 in our own life table analyses, we sometimes obtained survival rates of certain life stages that were greater than 100% (Zhou et al.
There are two candidates: one is the Australian Life Table (ALT) published by the Australian Government Actuary and the other is the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Life Table.
Correction: Television viewing time and reduced life expectancy: A life table analysis.
I will always remember with the Sporting Life table, it was the last day at Kelso - a Wednesday.
DFLE is a measure of expected value that, by definition, can only be estimated using a life table model.
In 1662, a London draper conducted a study that became the basis for the original life table, and 30 years later, astronomer Edmond Halley--best known for computing the orbit of the comet that bears his name--constructed the first mortality table, which could be used to provide a link between a life insurance premium and the average life spans based on statistical laws of mortality and compound interest.
Although a complete life table from birth could not be constructed, the present truncated estimates are based on actual age-specific death rates thanks to the large study sample and the long follow-up duration.