Liberal

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Related to liberalness: liberal-minded

Liberal

A person who believes that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. Liberalism was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
6] Liberalness of state voters will relate more to the adoption of earlier state lotteries than later adoptions.
Berrol gives special attention to the "failure" of native-born African Americans, which is attributed at various points to their unwillingness to take jobs; the liberalness of school reforms, which allowed students to substitute black history for more traditional courses; and the adherence to "black ethnocentrism.
An area's liberalness or conservativeness only seemed to add to those areas that were already advantaged in some way.
Living in a wet area (whether the respondent grew up in a wet or a dry region) and being reared in and currently living in an urban area increased the liberalness of drinking norms and of the home drinking environment.
Whitby and Gilliam (1991) provide evidence that racial composition did have such an effect in a transitional period but that by the 1980s the contribution of black voters to the party extended their influence beyond specific contexts, with the result being a generally greater liberalness among southern Democrats not correlated to racial concentration.
72) and good discriminant validity as supported by low correlations with intelligence, social desirability, and political liberalness (Lester & Bishop, 1997).