Liberal

(redirected from liberalists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Liberal

A person who believes that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. Liberalism was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
20) Rodrik (2010) contains sharp criticism of the liberalist policies.
After a state of hit-and-run for more than seven hours, supporters of Morsi left the square, while the liberalists stayed there and continued to call for a constitution that represents all Egyptians.
The ideological principles of the founding period were intimately connected with these liberalist principles, the protection of private property serving as the primary driving force behind political documents and compacts.
The liberalists are concerned that children from one-parent families will be made to feel that their version of home-life is "second-best".
Last chance for Saint-Petersburg liberalists to get support of V.
Even so, we can now expect long-haired bearded liberalists crying about an erosion of civil liberties and the claim that we are living under a nanny state.
If that had been replaced by a blanket ban I think a lot of people would have been very disillusioned with politicians and politics While the Government has come up with a number of compromises that most people will be quite happy with, there are those who will be offended by these proposals, chiefly health fanatics and staunch liberalists.
The ideas and expressions of liberalists are included in order to explore the criticism of nationalist economic thought.
The liberalists among us who said sales of alcohol in supermarkets and corner shops would stamp out the "forbidden fruit" element have been proved wrong.
Philo was above all a man of the pen and not the sword who felt that his enemies - sophists, liberalists, and antisemites-could be overwhelmed in argument.
Beginning with the Mexican liberalists of the nineteenth century, she is considered both the mother of the mestizo nation and, contradictorily, a symbol of antipatriotismo, a traitor to her people, whom, as Octavio Paz writes in El laberinto de la soledad, Mexico would never forgive.