let

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Lease

An agreement between two parties whereby one party allows the other to use his/her property for a certain period of time in exchange for a periodic fee. The property covered in a lease is usually real estate or equipment such as an automobile or machinery. There are two main kinds of leases. A capital lease is long-term and ownership of the asset transfers to the lessee at the end of the lease. An operating lease, on the other hand, is short-term and the lessor retains all rights of ownership at all times.

let

To rent out.

References in classic literature ?
My darling," said he, "I beg of you, for my sake and for our child's sake, as well as for your own, that you will never for one instant let that idea enter your mind
That is the way with those Goobra people - they can't seem to let a chance go by to throw it in your face that their day is three hundred and twenty-two of our years long.
All of a sudden the whole region fairly rocked under the crash of eleven hundred and one thunder blasts, all let off at once, and Sandy says, -
But what do you let a person look at your hand for, with that awful thing printed on it?
If I had let the man kill him, wouldn't he have killed me, too?
she thought, with a pang at her heart -- "oh let me do something innocent and kind for the sake of old times
Let us not then suspect our happie State Left so imperfet by the Maker wise, As not secure to single or combin'd.
Then let me not let pass Occasion which now smiles, behold alone The Woman, opportune to all attempts, Her Husband, for I view far round, not nigh, Whose higher intellectual more I shun, And strength, of courage hautie, and of limb Heroic built, though of terrestrial mould, Foe not informidable, exempt from wound, I not; so much hath Hell debas'd, and paine Infeebl'd me, to what I was in Heav'n.
Whilst she played and sang, she thought over what Sir Charles had just let slip.
If I were a man, I would not, for mere chivalry's sake, let a woman treat me like a troublesome dog.
Occasionally there was no way of satisfying them but to let them search the place to which the girl had been traced.
He was not sure that he could manage the "sheeny," and he did not mean to take any chances with his district; let the Republicans nominate a certain obscure but amiable friend of Scully's, who was now setting tenpins in the cellar of an Ashland Avenue saloon, and he, Scully, would elect him with the "sheeny's" money, and the Republicans might have the glory, which was more than they would get otherwise.