let

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Lease

An agreement between two parties whereby one party allows the other to use his/her property for a certain period of time in exchange for a periodic fee. The property covered in a lease is usually real estate or equipment such as an automobile or machinery. There are two main kinds of leases. A capital lease is long-term and ownership of the asset transfers to the lessee at the end of the lease. An operating lease, on the other hand, is short-term and the lessor retains all rights of ownership at all times.

let

To rent out.

References in periodicals archive ?
The saint, also known as The Little Flower, was known to have prophesied that she would be very active after her death, saying: "I'll let fall a shower of roses on the earth when I'm in heaven.
Aa This tired, morally bankrupt American mantra essentially argues that only the rich, the strong, the oppressors and the enforcers of injustice (notably the Americans and the Israelis) have the right to use violence, while the poor, the weak, the oppressed and the victims of injustice must renounce violence, submit to their fate and accept whatever crumbs their betters may magnanimously deign suitable to let fall from their table -- a principle dear to the hearts and minds of those who are happy with the status quo but not one likely to win hearts and minds among those who are not or, indeed, anyone who believes that justice should be pursued and injustice resisted.
In times of financial struggle, some of the first things that people let fall by the wayside are car payments and car insurance payments.
Its revitalization and sustainability will not only secure greater tax revenues, but it will move the perception of our town and revitalize a downtown area that is too good to let fall to the wayside.
Lay migas on top of pork belly and let fall off the side to the right onto the lentils.
Indeed, a generalization one can make about Biblical Religion and the Novel is that its chief interest and value reside not so much in the particular theses pursued as in the information and insights the various contributors let fall along the way.
The treasure's value is far greater than mere money; it contains incalculable power, and is far too dangerous to let fall in the wrong hands.