Lessor

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Related to lessors: lessers

Lessor

An entity that leases an asset to another entity.

Lessor

The owner of land, a house, or other property who sells the right to use the property for a set period of time. Sometimes, this includes the right to develop land belonging to another, but normally it is the right to live on or use an already developed property. The contract governing a lessor's rights is a lease; it generally includes the lessee's right to use the property under certain conditions without undue interference from the lessor for the period of time described in the lease. In exchange, the lessee pays rent.

lessor

The owner of an asset who permits another party to use the asset under a lease. Compare lessee.

Lessor

One who rents property to another. In the case of real estate, the lessor is also known as the landlord.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the challenges aircraft lessors will need to navigate over the coming years include industry cyclicality, geopolitical risk, oil price volatility, competitive pressures on underwriting standards, funding and placing the delivery of large aircraft order books, residual value risk associated with older model planes, and rising interest rates.
Slais continued, "We then tapped Alios Finance in Lusaka, a member of The Global Lessor Network, to finance the transaction.
An operating lease, put simply, is a lease where the lessor takes residual risk on the asset and rent is broadly based on the actual cost (including depreciation) and profit margin to the lessor, with the lessor taking back the asset at the end of the lease.
The lessor owns the car, unless the lessee options to buy it at the end-of-term or refinances the remaining amount.
SECURITY DEPOSITS: It's fairly common for a lease to require you to pay the lessor a security deposit.
Since the lessee of an operating lease can have the option to cancel the lease prematurely, the operating leases are not guaranteed by a third party like bank, or any other institution or individual, because it denies the right of lessor to terminate the lease agreement before maturity.
The tax consequences to the lessor and lessee of a rent holiday will generally be governed by Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 467.
Examples: a stand-by letter of credit by a major bank may be inserted as security; the lessor can participate as a term lender, also.
This influx of capital may unduly influence competitive dynamics, drive down price/lease terms, and focus certain lessors on the near-term goals of their private-equity backers.
Lessors can join The Global Lessor Network and see transaction opportunities that match their interests and geography at http://www.
The proposal is designed to provide a single model for lease accounting for both lessees and lessors - a 'right of use' approach.
The airline has reportedly renegotiated leases for 88 aircraft with a group of lessors, with rates set to save it USD200m in annual rent payments.