lead


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Related to lead: lead poisoning

Lead

Payment of a financial obligation earlier than is expected or required.

lead

A heavy metal shown to cause learning disabilities, behavioral problems, seizures, and even death in children.The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 3 to 4 million children had elevated lead levels in their blood in 1978. The number has now been reduced to several hundred thousand, but elevated lead levels in blood is still the leading environmentally induced illness in children.

Federal law that went into effect in 1996 requires sellers and landlords of properties built before 1978 (when lead-based paint became illegal) to do the following before any contract or lease becomes final:

1. Provide a copy of the EPA booklet, “Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home.”
2. Disclose any known information concerning lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.
3. Provide any records and reports on lead-based paint and/or lead-based paint hazards.
4. Include an attachment to the contract or lease (or language inserted in the lease itself) that includes a lead warning statement and confirms that the seller or landlord has complied with all notification requirements.
5. Provide home buyers a 10-day period to conduct a paint inspection or risk assessment for lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.

References in periodicals archive ?
They delegate account servicing, plan their sales activities and strategies, qualify leads to avoid working with the wrong prospects, and constantly analyze their sales results.
Proposed Methodology to Determine Source and Level of Lead Contamination in Cocoa.
In Schwartz's Baltimore Memory Study, which is tracking 1,000 men and women in their 50s, 60s, and 70s, the average bone lead level of the participants is 19 parts per million (ppm).
But it's referred to as "lead," because when graphite was discovered, everyone thought it was a type of lead.
In the United States, at least 29 states have proposed or adopted legislation that will regulate or restrict the use of lead or impose additional requirements for products that contain lead.
In the early 1960's, the level of lead in paint was voluntarily set at 5% by industry standards.
Using a technique called inductively coupled plasma-optical-mission spectroscopy, a forensic chemist determines the proportion of each element in the lead alloy.
Although the report said the DFG should consider banning lead bullets and shot within the condors' range, ``there is no smoking gun in the report that says, yes, it's lead from ammunition and we're going to have to consider some sort of ban,'' according to Lorna Bernard, a DFG spokesperson.
Warren's study of lead poisoning serves as a window through which a major cultural shift in attitudes toward health, safety and risk can be viewed and analyzed.
Last July, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) President Kweisi Mfume called lead paint poisoning a "silent epidemic" that heavily impacts African-American communities.
The degradation of gray cast iron microstructures due to trace amounts of lead frequently has been reported in the past, however, there has not been sufficient information for foundrymen to determine: